Wednesday, February 29, 2012

The 68Mission - Part 3: Micah 6:8 In Our Lives


This is the 2nd article in a series called "The 68Mission." The series examines the potential impact of Micah 6:8 on churches today. In "Part 1: God's Case Against His People," I described how Micah 6 is presented as a covenant lawsuit that God is bringing against Israel in Micah's day. In "Part 2: The Nature of God's Requirements," I examined the three timeless commands God gives to all people: do justice, love steadfastly, and walk humbly with God.


How does Micah 6:8 relate to churches today?


A fulfillment of Micah 6:8 in our lives would have us living our lives in three directions at once: toward God (though humility), toward one another (with steadfast love), and toward the world (with justice). We must always be mindful that God created us for relationships. In Genesis 1:26-27, we relate to God as our Creator, to each other as male and female, and to the world by dominion/management of it.


Micah 6:8 is fundamental to being spiritual. A parallel New Testament verse that describes our spiritual obligation is James 1:27: "Religion that is pure and undefiled before God, the Father, is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained by the world." Echoing Micah, James compels believers to let their faith in God permeate their lives, and by extension, the church.


Much has been written about the role of doing social good in the name of Christ without the gospel. And much has been written about sharing the gospel without showing Christ's love through our deeds. We must do both! Peter described Jesus as going about "doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil, for God was with him" (Acts 10:38). And Jesus did not just become a human to be an example of someone who did good deeds; he died and rose from the grave to make us right with God (cf. 1 Pet. 3:18).


Could a life--or a church for that matter--be centered on the three principles of Micah 6:8? Could our very reason for existing to be on mission with God to do justice, love steadfastly, and walk humbly? This is The 68Mission.


The 68Mission practices justice by caring for orphans and widows, standing up for those who cannot defend themselves, and rescuing those who are trapped in destructive lifestyles (such as those captured in the sex-slave "industry"). The message of the gospel must be intrinsically tied to these kinds of actions.


The 68Mission loves steadfastly by becoming a part of a holistic, missional Christian community. A 68Mission church would not be a church with small groups, but a church of small groups. The groups would not focus simply on Bible content, but on the transforming power of God's Word on our relationships with God, one another, and the world.


The 68Mission walks humbly with God by truly submitting to his Word and his Spirit. Like the Jews in Berea, it receives "the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things are so" (Acts 17:11).


A 68Mission church does not have a number of disparate tasks, programs, or functions, but the mission of God is its function. At its heart, it doesn't exist for the sake of programs, nor does it use programs to try to make disciples of the nations. Instead, it creates disciple-makers through relationships--disciple-makers who come to understand that every day they live is another day to do justice, love steadfastly, and walk humbly.

signature

Labels: , , , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home